Wednesday, June 04, 2008

Let Wabi-Sabi Happen in Your Journal

Wabi-sabi, the quintessential Japanese aesthetic, can be applied to journaling and is, in fact, an integral part of true journaling, whether we realize it or not. Wabi-sabi is the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. It is a beauty of things modest, humble and unconventional.

Published writing is usually rewritten, edited and polished writing, set in symmetrical fonts and printed in uniform order and quality. Journaling, most often, is composed of our raw thoughts or emotions, scribbled down in an unsteady hand on a commuter train or a dimly-lit kitchen. Perhaps the pages are occasionally smudged with ink or stained by drops of coffee. Entries may be heartfelt and passionate, but can simultaneously be random, incomplete, unconventional and bold, without need to please an audience.

In the long run, the journaling process may add up to a complete picture or an epiphany of revelation, but tracing any single journal's pages, one-by -one, can render a modest journey, the humbleness of following a foggy path with no promise of reaching a clearing.Most distilled, the Wabi-Sabi of journaling embraces a sense of faith -- in yourself, in life, and in the promise of a future.


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3 comments:

Ruth Folit said...

Cynthia,
You've illuminated a quality of journal writing that most appeals to me. Journal writing is imperfect and real and incomplete, which is essentially what life is. Authenticity, the cornerstone of journal writing, presents itself as it is--often without polish and perfection. Thanks for bringing these two concepts together: it's a fresh way of thinking about journal writing for me, even though I've kept a journal for more than 35 years.

Ruth Folit
Chronicles Software Company
www.lifejournal.com
LifeJournal, innovative journal software

Anonymous said...

It is certainly interesting for me to read that article. Thanks for it. I like such themes and anything connected to this matter. I definitely want to read more soon.

Anete Swenson

Anonymous said...

Rather cool site you've got here. Thanks for it. I like such themes and anything connected to them. I would like to read more on that blog soon.

Avril Simpson